Crypt Pygmaea Question

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Crypt Pygmaea Question

Postby Purrbox » Mon Feb 12, 2007 9:01 pm

A few months ago I placed an order for some plants. Of course the weather decided to turn cold right as the plants were shipped to me. As a result they were all in pretty beat up shape by the time I received them. Two of the three plants (including C. willisii) have bounced back and are growing well now. The third was C. pygmaea and is still having problems.

Both of the Crypts were placed in my Emersed Setup upon arrival. The C. willisii suffered some melt but is now sending out tons of baby plants. The C. pygmaea on the otherhand slowly melted away to nothing. This weekend I took a closer look and found that two of the rhyzomes where still firm but the rest had turned to mush. I thought that I had read someplace that the best thing to do in this situation is to float the rhyzomes in an established tank for awhile, and that they will start sprouting leaves again within a few weeks. They're floating in one of my tanks as I type.

So finally my question. Is this the best approach to take to try to revive the plants or should I be doing something else instead?

Thanks!
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Postby AaronT » Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:00 am

What does your emersed setup consist of? If I'm not mistaken pygmea prefers an acidic substrate so perhaps that was the problem?
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Postby SCMurphy » Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:16 am

Answer Aaron's questions first.

Yes, the technique you remember reading is one used to revive crypts from dire situations. Jan was using this method in his home aquarium on a hoard of C. striolata when I was in Emmen. The plants were stumps on Thursday when I arrived, they were starting to produce small leaves and roots when I left on Wednesday. If the rhizome of your plant is still firm and there are any white roots there is a chance that this will work.
"したくさ" Sean

Aquascape? I'm a crypt farmer.

If you've got bait, I've got wasabi!

That IS an aquascape, it's titled THE VACANT LOT.
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Postby Purrbox » Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:39 am

I've got a large plastic container that holds everything. There are three shoe box sized plastic containers that have been modified with a dremel to allow for drainage and water flow in the larger container. I'm planning to switch to square gardening containers so that its easier to keep plants separated, but since the nurseries are still closed for the season these have been hard to locate. The three small containers are filled with Turface MVP. The large container is filled with water to just below the surface of the Turface. Everything is covered with a humidity dome that I constructed from clear vinyl and a wire frame. The entire setup is on the second shelf of a 4 shelf indoor greenhouse that is infront of a sunny window (The African Violets on the next shelf up love this window). I add a small amount of macros to the water about once a week or less and mist the plants with a dilute micro solution when I remember.

Let me know if you need any more information.
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Postby AaronT » Tue Feb 13, 2007 1:47 pm

Are you using rain water, distilled water or RO water in the setup? Pygmea does better in a low pH. The other Crypt you mentioned willisii will do fine in tap water, but lowering the pH will greatly aide the pygmea in its recovery.

I would try floating the rhizome as you and Sean suggested and see if you can get some nice white roots and a few small leaves to form.
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Postby Purrbox » Tue Feb 13, 2007 4:08 pm

Since I didn't realize that this was one of the more demanding Crypts, I've just been using tap water. Luckily the tap water here isn't liquid rock, but I'm sure it isn't as low as this Crypt would prefer.

Right now it's floating in a tank that also uses tap water, would it be better off in a cup of distilled or RO water with a small amount of ferts?
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Postby AaronT » Wed Feb 14, 2007 10:07 am

It should be okay in the tap water. It will do better in the flow of the filter than standing still in a cup. Crypts love a lot of water flow. Though, I am able to get away with using standing water in my emersed setup it would probably do better with some flow.
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Postby Purrbox » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:21 pm

Thanks for the help guys. Sounds like I should keep doing what I was already doing.

I'd already been hoping to buy a second green house so that I'd have room for orchids and a second emersed setup. Guess this gives me an extra reason, since it would allow me to leave the orginal setup as is and create the second with lower KH water for the more demanding Crypts.
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Postby AaronT » Thu Feb 15, 2007 11:50 am

You can't ever have too many greenhouses. :D
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Postby Purrbox » Mon Feb 26, 2007 9:07 am

Well floating appears to be working. Both of the crypts still have nice firm rhizomes and one has even sprouted some tiny leaves.
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Postby AaronT » Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:39 am

Glad to hear it's working out for you. :D
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Postby Purrbox » Thu Mar 15, 2007 6:52 am

Progress Update.

Both rhizomes have doubled in size and the new growth is a nice healthy shade of green. The larger rhizome is now upto 6 tiny leaves no more than 2-4mm in length growing from two different spots. It has also grown several nice healthy white roots. The smaller rhizome hasn't put out any new roots or leaves yet, but it does have some bumps that look like they could be developeing into one or the other.

I've had both of them floating on a bed of Riccia for the last few weeks, as it makes it easier to both keep them floating and find them.
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Postby plantbrain » Thu Mar 15, 2007 8:32 am

I've found a mix of sand+ soil works best, peat can be added etc.
ADA AS has done well also out at the lab for some.

Hopefully I'll be able to get more going out there, I have far more test methods out there to measure things like bioavailable N and P and sediment measurements.

We did a small study on 5 wetland soils using Ludwigia. It would be nice to do a similar study on a species of Crypt.


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