Siesta w.r.t. Lights

Siesta w.r.t. Lights

Postby saugata » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:09 am

Hi!

Is there any benefit of switching off the lights in between say for a period of 2-3 hrs w.r.t. keeping alage off? If not, then is it disadvantageous to the plants if I switch off the lights in between say for a period of 3 hrs or so?

Thanks in adavnce for inputs from experts.
Regards,

Saugata Banerjee
Bangalore, India

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Postby Hanno » Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:00 am

Hello Saugata!

As far as I'm informed, it needs a break of 3hours to make algae feel uncomfy while higher plants are not negatively effected by this. In regard of the plants the break should begin min. after a 3-4 hour light phase, because they need to "wake up" in a way. I got this information by a plant physiologist of the university of cologne once.

For an example you could witch the light on from 9-14 h and 17-23 h.

I don't use breaks because I'm working from my home office and don't like looking to dark tanks during my coffee breaks. So I've always to deal with a few algae.

best regards Hanno
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Postby saugata » Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:08 am

Hi! Hanno,

Thanks a lot for your feedback. I also thought so. BTW, your light schedule streches it up to 11 hrs whereas I am looking at something close to 8 hrs as I am battling with GDA and would like to reduce the light for sometime.

The light schdule that I have in mind is something like this:-

10 AM to 2 PM - Lights on
2 PM to 6 PM - Lights off
6 PM to 10 PM 0 Lights on

What is your take on this schedule?
Regards,

Saugata Banerjee
Bangalore, India

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Postby shieber » Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:36 am

Diff folks have tried this over the years and there hasn't been any reports that it has demonstrated any particular effect good or bad. This is probably because there are algae that do well at high light, low light, and some that do well with short periods of light, whereas the plants have probably done most of their photosynthesis for the day after about 8 hours of strong lighting.


An alternative technique used by Amano, at least on his gigantic home aquarium is to have a small amount of lights on for most of the lighting period and intense lighting for only a few hours somewhere around the middle of the day, iirc.


But if you're set up to try diff things, it won't hurt to try and see what diffs you notice. That can be part of the fun of the hobby.

have plants, have fun,
sh
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Postby plantbrain » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:31 pm

If you have a weak CO2 system, then the break will allow enough CO2 to build back into the system when the lights come back on.

That's the only reason I can figure that would help plants.
Algae are highly responsive to light and can do the same thing as plants with respect to light in short hour range durations.

Plants have more reserves and much greater deamnds than algae, so they can survive longer blackout peroids of several days whereas many species of algae take a beating.

This method is often suggested but it's not proven effective in relations to algae unless you already had a CO2 issue to start with near as I can tell and none of the supportors seem to be able to reconcile that issue nor get accurate measurements.

When I do it with stable CO2 levels, you can clearly see the CO2 concentration rise after the lights go off.

We often do not know what the real CO2 is in such tanks and this would explain why it works in some cases and not in others.

The thing is, if you work at reoot problem, poor CO2 supply, underpowered, too much at night near the end of the light cycle, but not
enough during the main lighting peroid, you will benefit from such a light routine.

Light drives uptake of CO2 and the downstream nutrients for the most part, but mostly CO2 uptake.

And it seems that algae are very well correlated with poor CO2 use.
I have no algae and do not use siesta's also.

I can also try siesta's and see what happens to the nutrients and the CO2 levels.

But then again, I know what to look for more than a newbie with algae issues and I try to help them make sense out of their probelsm by finding the most likely causes rather than suggesting a method based on a very dubious at best and at worst a false pretense.

You need to talk to a aquatic macrophyte speciliaitist and a phycologist, not a plant physiologist(unless they are in these specific fields). You need specific research and methods.

Regards,
Tom Barr
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